Links & Resources

Featured Links

  • Witness to the Early American Experience. “The digital images of historical documents in this archive preserve the words of hundreds of eyewitnesses to the American Revolution in and around New York City. The letters, newspapers, broadsides, legal records, and maps presented here record events from the early years of the Dutch settlement of New Amsterdam through the British occupation of the city during the Revolution. Here you can explore the history of New York through the words of those who lived it”
  • John Bull & Uncle Sam: Four Centuries of British-American Relations. A joint project of the Library of Congress and The British Library, the John Bull and Uncle Sam exhibition brings together for the first time treasures from the two greatest libraries in the English-speaking world in an exploration of selected time periods and cultural movements that provide unique insights into the relationship of the United States and Great Britain. The Library of Congress and the British Library are unique among world cultural institutions in their range (more than 250 million items in the combined collections) and depth.

Sites on the U.S. Congress

Biographical

Other Documentary Editing Projects

George Washington Slept Here

Historic Sites

  • History is Fun: Jamestown Settlement and Yorktown Victory Center.
  • Sulgrave Manor is the ancestral home in England of George Washington’s family. The property is situated in the beautiful rural village community of Sulgrave, near to Banbury and about 30 miles from both Stratford-upon-Avon and Oxford. It was bought by Lawrence Washington, a wealthy wool merchant and Mayor of Northampton, when Henry VIII dissolved the monasteries. Lawrence’s descendants lived for over 120 years (1539–1659) in the home that he built.

Washington and Politics

  • The Internet Public Library: Presidents of the United States
  • The Founders’ Constitution. Sponsored by the University of Chicago and the Liberty Fund. “In this unique anthology, Philip B. Kurland and Ralph Lerner draw on the writings of a wide array of people engaged in the problem of making popular government safe, steady, and accountable. The documents included range from the early seventeenth century to the 1830s, from the reflections of philosophers to popular pamphlets, from public debates in ratifying conventions to the private correspondence of the leading political actors of the day.”

Washington and War

Washington Papers

Martha Washington

For Kids

Links, &c.

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