Recent News and Updates

The Washington Papers Receives $320,000 Grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities

August 11, 2017

On August 2, 2017, The Washington Papers received a $320,000 grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) and a federal matching grant for another $100,000.

Funding will maintain work already underway on The Papers of George Washington. The grant specifically supports preparation for volumes 26-32 of the Revolutionary War Series and publication of volumes 20-21 of the Presidential Series. These nine volumes will complete the print collection of The Papers of George Washington, a documentary edition that began in the late 1960s, with support from NEH, among other charitable institutions.

This year, The Washington Papers was one of 15 projects in Virginia that was awarded funding from NEH, which announced $39.3 million in grant offers for 245 humanities projects across the United States.

“NEH grants ensure that Americans around the country have the opportunity to engage with our shared cultural heritage,” said NEH acting chairman Jon Parrish Peede in last week’s grant awards announcement.

As The Washington Papers move towards concluding The Papers of George Washington (as well as engaging in new ventures such as the Martha Washington Papers project), we are proud to be one of the many projects contributing to that mission.

The Washington Papers remains grateful for the funding it continues to receive from NEH, as well as from the federal matching program and private donors. For a full list of our current and past donors, click here.

A Documentary Dilemma: Editing the Farewell Address

January 17, 2017

Senior Editor David Hoth’s guiding principle in documentary editing is to display the evidence without influencing a reader’s conclusions. His current focus, George Washington’s Farewell Address, complicates that principle. This document is included in Presidential Series volume 20 and arguably is one of Washington’s most significant contributions to the institution of the U.S. presidency. Hoth’s research into its preparation led him to suggest that we “cannot assume what has always been assumed” of this document.

Continue reading

Georgia Meets the Papers of George Washington

November 2, 2016

George Washington’s composure under duress and remarkable memory for facts and pertinent details provided the basic tools of successful leadership, the managing editor of The Papers of George Washington told an audience in Savannah, Ga., recently.

Dr. William Ferraro was responding to a question posed by Stan Deaton, senior historian of the Georgia Historical Society, before a crowd of more than 350 at an event titled “George Washington, Leadership and Global Revolution.”  The event, held at Savannah’s historic First Baptist Church in late September, was sponsored by the historical society and the UVA Club of Savannah.

Continue reading

What is the Center for Digital Editing?: A Partner, a Leader, an Organizer

by Jennifer Stertzer, Senior Editor at the Washington Papers and Director of the CDE
October 28, 2016

The Center for Digital Editing (CDE) at the University of Virginia has a very specific mission: to advance the practice of editing by creating and encouraging the growth of innovative project solutions. We aim to help projects accomplish the twin goals of documentary editing—scholarship and accessibility—by taking full advantage of the possibilities of our hyperlinked world. Over the past year, we have identified four elements we see as essential to advancing that mission: research and development, engagement, project consultation and development, and education.

Continue reading

Washington Papers Editors Share Work, Meet Hamilton’s George Washington at Human/Ties National Endowment for the Humanities Conference

by Kim Curtis, Research Editor
September 30, 2016

From September 14 to 17, the University of Virginia (UVA) hosted Human/Ties, a four-day celebration of the 50th anniversary of the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH). To explore and honor the vital role played by the humanities in today’s world, the forum brought together multiple University departments and programs, including the Washington Papers, as well as speakers and artists from across the country and around the world.

Continue reading

George Washington at the Battle of Princeton

Civil War?: The American Revolution through Multiple Lenses

March 23, 2016

George Washington at the Battle of Princeton

George Washington at the Battle of Princeton New Jersey, 1777.

Over the weekend, several of our editors and staff attended the fifth annual Conference of the American Revolution, hosted by America’s History, LLC in Williamsburg, where Director Edward G. Lengel gave a presentation on the Battle of Germantown.

Other leading historians lectured on topics ranging from Washington to Benedict Arnold, Concord to Pensacola, and local preservation to global context. Interestingly, a number of scholars of the American Civil War, drawn to the colonial conflict and its aftermath, were in attendance.

For another account of how the Civil War inspired perceptions of the American Revolution, see Research Editor Kim Curtis’s recent article on D. W. Griffith’s film America in light of his better-known Birth of a Nation.

Bust of George Washinton

The Washington Papers and the Florence Gould Foundation Embark on a Partnership to Explore Early Franco-American Relations

Houdon Bust

George Washington. Sculpted by Jean-Antoine Houdon, 1785.

France and the United States have a long tradition of friendship, forged in the course of two great 18th-century revolutions and tempered in the flames of two global wars in the 20th century. The Washington Papers project stands poised to record the origins of the Franco-American alliance with the editing and publication of the final 16 volumes of the Revolutionary War Series, covering the years from 1780 to 1783. These volumes will chronicle Rochambeau’s landing with a French expeditionary army in North America in the autumn of 1780; his strategic planning with Washington in the winter of 1780-1781; the Yorktown campaign of the summer and autumn of 1781; and finally, the protracted negotiations that led to the Treaty of Paris in 1783.

The Washington Papers project is proud to announce a major new partnership with the Florence Gould Foundation, ensuring that these documents chronicling the most important period in the history of Franco-American relations are edited and published in time for the project’s completion in 2024. With the Gould Foundation’s major and ongoing financial support, the Washington Papers will hire an expert scholar whose time will be fully devoted to editing these documents as well as carrying on important research in French archives.

Continue reading

Nearing Completion, the George Washington Financial Papers Project Will Expand Scholarship on Washington and the Versatility of the Digital Humanities

By Jennifer E. Stertzer, Senior Editor
January 29, 2015

Making George Washington’s financial papers accessible had been an early goal of the Washington Papers, but given the intricacies of the financial papers and our means of publication, very little had been done. In the 1980s, the Washington Papers published several cash accounts (in print) from the ledgers in the Colonial Series of the Papers of George Washington. Over the years, we included a few others as documents and used them for our annotations where possible. Things began to shift as we moved forward with our digital rendition of the letterpress volumes. We began to think about solutions for the financial papers, and our ideas grew and evolved with the huge advances made in the field of digital humanities in the last few years.

Continue reading

Completing the Transcription of the Barbados Diary

January 27, 2016

Though the project only began in July 2015, the Washington Papers is pleased to announce that our transcription of George Washington’s Barbados diary is complete! We’re excited to be closer to publishing a newly transcribed and annotated edition, the first in more than a century. Washington’s Barbados diary, written when he was 19 years old, records the only foreign excursion he ever took.

Continue reading